November 06, 2017

Hunting is a specialised sport, and for that, you need special tools. Firstly, when it comes to hunting knives, bigger isn’t necessarily better. It all depends on the size of the animal you wish to hunt. A big knife is useless when dressing small game, as you can easily imagine. Someone hunting deer will have a different job for their knife compared to someone hunting rabbits. A quality hunting knife should be versatile enough to do everything the average hunter needs plus a little bit more.

Types of Hunting Knives

To make things easy we will differentiate between the two main types. Fixed blade knives, and folding knives. From the perspective of most hunters, fixed blade knives are superior to their folding counterparts. Predominantly because they are stronger and more reliable to get the job done, and also easier to clean because they don’t have any cavities.

But let’s get to the point!

Hunting Knives Blade Styles

Drop Point – Marabou Knife from the Professional Hunters Series

Marabou Knife from the Professional Hunters Series

 

 

The shape of this blade is hugely popular amongst hunters as a great all-purpose knife because it has a large and prominent blade side for cutting (the belly), as well as a highly controllable point for piercing. (The knife in this picture has a Mammoth Molar handle)

Trailing Point - Sailfish Knife from the Predator Series

Sailfish Knife from the Predator Series

 

 

The shape of this blade curves upward, and hunters and fisherman love trailing point knives because they are designed exclusively for slicing or skinning (and making neat fillets). Cleanly separating the skin from the game or fish, but also has a sharp point for fine, delicate, and small work. (The knife in this picture has a South African Wild Olive Wood handle)

Modified Trailing Point - Rhino Knife from the Giant Series

Rhino Knife from the Giant Series

 

 

This blade shape offers the advantage of a trailing point but without the negatives of the trailing point blade shape. The large surface area of the cutting edge (belly) is perfect for slicing and skinning, but doesn’t have the weak point and can handle quite a bit of abuse. (The knife in this picture has a Crocodile Hide handle)

Clip Point - Vulture Knife from the Scavenger Series

Vulture Knife from the Scavenger Series

 

 

This is a very popular blade shape, and makes for an excellent hunting knife blade, particularly because the point is very sharp, easy to control, and good for piercing hides. But still offering plenty of cutting edge (belly) for slicing. (The knife in this picture has a Mammoth Molar handle)

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